Albuquerque Senior Centers' Hiking Groups (ASCHG)

Chupadera Peak Hike
In Socorro Region

Hike Id H10155
Last Update 2018-05-22 22:02:59.0
Hike Class D
Hike Miles 9.3
Minimum Elevation 4525
Elevation Gain 1715
Total Uphill 1725
Total Downhill 1725
Avg Grade 8 %
Route Type InOut
Drive Miles Round Trip 200
Drive Time Oneway 1:30
Hiking Seasons Sprg, Fall, Wntr
Hike Rating (Hike not rated)
New Mexico Game Unit 20
All On Trail Yes
All Paved/Gravel Roads Yes

Highlights Strenuous hike to a high point with views of Bosque del Apache from above, rock formations.

Cautions Desert hike with no shade. Can be windy. Hiking poles recommended for steep top portion. Dress carefully, because you can also get hot going uphill.

Trailhead Directions I-25 South past Socorro to exit 139 (San Antonio). Turn left on Hwy 380 then right on SR-1 just after the Owl Cafe. Travel 6.8 mi south from this intersection. Just past the 45 mile marker, there will be a small brown sign on the right. Turn right and go under the wooden RR trestle, about 1/2 mile to the parking area for the Chupadera Wilderness Trail.

Actual Hike Hike from the Chupadera Peak trailhead, which is in the north section of the Bosque del Apache. At the beginning of the hike, there may be several options where trails cross, but keep a general westward direction to go by a power POLE (1.0 mi) and through a tunnel under I-25 (UNDERHWY (2.2 mi)). Now the pretty (and steep) part of the hike begins, as you hike to the Chocolate CANYON (3.8 mi), through a GATE (4.5 mi), and then to Chupadera PEAK (4.65 mi). The second half of the hike has an 11% average grade.

The hike can be done as far as the Chocolate CANYON to reduce the difficulty to a "C" hike (1100 feet climbing). Hikers who don't want to do the full hike can always stop and wait for the others to return.

Comments The trail has two distinct features. It crosses two habitat zones from the lower Sonora, characterized first by creosote bush, aka greasewood, to the upper Sonora with grass and several vegatation types such as soto and barrel cactus not native to the Albuquerque area. Also the red andesite-rhyolite ash flows tuffs form significant clifts at the Chocolate Canyon (named by one of our hikers), being some 30 million years old from the start of the rifting along the Rio Grande graben. Quail have been seen as well as damage to prickly pear cactus caused by the javelinas who live in the Chupadera Wilderness area.

© DeLorme. Topo North America ™ 9

Map File Download it.  Usually a larger image.

Waypoints
PARK: N33 49.344, W106 53.487
POLE: N33 49.625, W106 54.240
UNDERHWY: N33 49.853, W106 55.439
CANYON: N33 50.428, W106 56.653
GATE: N33 50.741, W106 56.943
PEAK: N33 50.831, W106 56.989


GPS Files Click link to download file.
GPX:WayTrack, 17Jan12, Garmin, Marilyn Warrant

Pictures Click here to see them.

Text Author Theodore (Ted) Cooley
Map Author Marilyn Warrant
Waypoints Author Marilyn Warrant
Track Author Marilyn Warrant
Maintainer John Cooper